Author Envy? Maybe it’s time for a GREEN Diet.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Now that I’m 42, I seem to have (mostly) moved past getting hung up on jealousy — or maybe it’s because between my own books, my freelance writing, my kiddo, and family life I no longer have the luxury of time to bathe in the sea of jealousy. More likely, however, is that I now have had enough successes and failures of my own to understand you can’t always be…

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5 Ways to Spring Clean Your Writing Life

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

There’s still plenty of snow and ice outside, and the groundhogs were divided on whether spring really is right around the corner, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get to a little spring cleaning while you wait for the thaw (unless you live in a place where you’re already wearing shorts and tending to your garden … and if that’s the case, I’m not sure we can be friends).  …

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Words of Advice…

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to hear Jodi Picoult read from her latest novel LEAVING TIME, and to meet her for the briefest of moments while she signed my book. She was funny, and gracious, and quite down to earth despite her 23 books – the last 8 of which have made it on the NYT bestsellers list. And while I loved learning about the book,…

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Getting the call doesn’t mean the work is done

Friday, October 10, 2014

You’d think that when I got my agent and my book contract, I’d be singing from the hilltops about my good fortune! And I did, if by hilltops you mean a 4×4 room with a desk and a telephone. At the time I got “the call”, I was still a cubicle farm dweller at a large (yep, you’ve heard of it) tech company in Silicon Valley. I’d been sending my…

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The Reason Deb Dana Doesn’t Like Clowns

When I was growing up, there were rules. Not crazy rules. More like “Halloween candy isn’t for breakfast” rules. Or “you can’t wear skirts so short they show your lady parts” rules. As someone now closer to making the rules as a parent than having to follow them, I now see these weren’t so much rules as they were common sense. In sixth grade, however, I befriended a girl whose…

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
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Summer Re-Reading With Deb Eleanor

I was recently on a panel at the South Carolina Book Festival where our topic was “Great Summer Reads.” At the outset, I mused that there is no corollary to the summer read. No one ever says, “Hey! This’ll make a great winter read!” I think this is all due to the way we set up our educational system. Because we grew up with summers off from school, those months…

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
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Deb Elise Will Get Sand In Any Spine

I’ve got to be honest — I don’t get the whole “beach read” thing. By that I don’t mean that I won’t take a book to the beach.  On the contrary, I will ALWAYS take a book to the beach… or to the movies (time before the movie starts), or to the supermarket (checkout lines!), or anywhere and everywhere else I go. What I don’t get is why any book…

Monday, June 13, 2011
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Deb Elise Discusses the Birds and the Bees of Book-to-Film

Okay, kids. Now when a movie producer and an author love each other very much… I’m in L.A., and have worked in the TV/film industry for several years, but I’ve never been an author with a movie-potential novel, so I had no idea how the process really works. I’d seen blurbs in the trades about book rights selling for huge sums of money, so I pretty much thought that was…

Monday, June 6, 2011
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Books That Changed Deb Eleanor’s Life

Over on my personal blog, I’ve been working on a series of posts called “Books I Love.”  It’s a cataloguing of the books that survive all my bookshelf purges, that I return to again and again, that have impacted me in one way or another. 1. Evening Class, Maeve Binchy.  I already mentioned this when I wrote about my favorite fictional place, but it bears repeating.  This book was my…

Tuesday, November 9, 2010
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Stereotypes, Sequins, and Starvation by Deb Lisa Daily

Stereotype: The rich and famous author. Most people outside of publishing believe all authors to be rich and famous. Most published authors are, ahem, not. In fact, most books don’t even earn out their advance. In 2004, Nielsen Bookscan tracked the sales of 1.2 million books in the United States. Here are the statistics: –Of those 1.2 million, 950,000 sold fewer than 99 copies. (79%) –Another 200,000 sold fewer than…

Wednesday, January 23, 2008
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