Sometimes Anticipation Is the Best Part

I love a great sex scene, especially the ones that are stomach flippingly good. I admire the authors that can describe every caress, every tantalizing touch with such gusto that the reader can’t help but get carried away. I love getting swoony along with the characters, having my heart race and my skin tingle. I love the creative euphemisms some authors employ. I love sweet and tender sex scenes, awkward first time sex scenes, and steamy-let’s-test-the-rules-of-physics sex scenes. I even enjoy the occasional scene that makes me Google a new term (then quickly delete my history, cookies, cache and whatever else might be tracking it so my kids don’t see it). I love them all.

reverseOlicity

This is actually reversed from the original clip for maximum naughtiness.
Seemed appropriate in this post. 

I, however, cannot write such scenes.

I’ve tried — both in THE COINCIDENCE OF COCONUT CAKE and the book I’m working on now. And they just aren’t good. Sure, with some editing I could make them work well enough — but I don’t want to bore readers with adequate sex scenes. I want them to sizzle on the page. Alas, my steamy scenes are cliche, I lose track of hands, and, honestly, it isn’t my favorite part to write. I much prefer the tension fraught scenes leading up to the sex. The anticipation is almost always the best part.

glassesOlicity

I prefer to explore the moments leading up to the realization that Character A must kiss Character B. I love playing with the million ways two people can get excited without touching. A glance, a whisper, and an interrupted almost kiss. And then, at last, they have their moment. When my characters finally do fall into each other’s arms, I let them get a little steamy, then give them their privacy.

Ultimately, I have a story to tell and I get to tell it my way– so I’m going to play to my strengths. I write funny, charming, and light fiction where my characters hook up behind closed doors. In other words, I avoid the whole sticky situation (pun intended).

16candles

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Amy Reichert

Amy E. Reichert is the author of THE COINCIDENCE OF COCONUT CAKE (Simon & Schuster/Gallery, July 21 2015), about food, love, and second chances, and where serendipity comes in the form of a delicious coconut cake. Find out more at amyereichert.com.

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This article has 6 Comments

  1. I like to write sexual tension which doesn’t get resolved, too. In stories, for example, any time a married character is tempted to stray, you know this urge will be acted on sooner or later. In real life, though, quite often it isn’t. Often the spouse knows about it, whether this is ever discussed or not. I imagine it’s part of most marriages, sooner or later.

    I have a couple I write about. He’s married, she’s in a long-term relationship, they’re never going to act on it, but it’s always there. You know, like in the real world. 🙂

  2. OK, maybe you don’t write the actual sex part, but you sure are queen of the “schmexy” (your word, and now my favorite) scenes!! That one with Lou and Al cooking together?? Ai-ai-ai!

    1. Ha! I’ll take the schmexy label — but that’s all part of the anticipation! (and yay — maybe you and Fred can do a little cooking now.) 😉

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