Ode to Liane Moriarty

Tuesday, December 1, 2020

My family moved to the United States from Taiwan when I was seven. To help us learn English, my mom used to take my sister and I to the library and that’s where my love of reading started. I couldn’t get enough of books. I read any and everything, regardless of subject matter or genre. I plowed through books like the Cam Jansen series, Encyclopedia Brown, and then eventually the…

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So Distracted I Forgot to Write About Writing Through Distractions!!!

Friday, October 23, 2020

So this is how Thursday went for me: 6am Yoga (yay! Got my exercise in) 7:30am Doing dishes leftover from last night when I was too. Tired. 8:00am Signed into work; how do we grow the bike movement today? (Note: still haven’t showered; Figure I’ll squeeze it in between meetings) 8:30am Text from Lyn: “Hi Ehsaneh – just wanted to remind you that today was your day to post about…

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Writing with Dogs, Virtual Learning and Day Drinking

Tuesday, October 20, 2020

How do I balance my writing with work, life and distractions? Before the pandemic, I would have said very well. Since the pandemic happened, not so much. With the advent of virtual learning and homeschooling an elementary school child, I have resorted to day drinking. I was hoping to get fired from my job as a homeschooling mom for drinking on the job. Alas, that didn’t happen, but my one…

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Cutting Room Floor for The Goddess Twins

Thursday, July 2, 2020

There is quite a bit that was shed from the original manuscript of The Goddess Twins to what has resulted in the published version that’s available today. When I was writing this story, I worked off of an outline, and even from the outline there are things that shifted and changed. I have found that the writing process can be like finding your way through a labyrinth. I am grateful…

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Novels arrive precisely when they mean to.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

I’m turning forty this year. And when you’re a middle-aged mom writing science fiction at four in the morning, it’s hard to look at all the startling young ingenues in their adorable city apartments, writing life-changing novels, getting MFAs, doing interviews with Lithub— —Let’s just say that I’ve been there. I understand. I thought my life was over in my early thirties when I turned out a truly awful epic…

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No longer such a perfect day

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Back in August, we Debutantes got together over video-conferencing to work on the list of topics we wanted to talk about this year. Some of these topics were developed in previous years by other Debs. Some, we came up with on our own. None of them were developed with a global pandemic in mind. This week’s topic is “A Perfect Day,” which I’m finding hard to talk about now that…

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Why I’m Choosing to Celebrate They Could Have Named Her Anything

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Publishing They Could Have Named Her Anything has already been more satisfying than I could have ever expected. I worked with a phenomenal illustrator to design the cover, deepened my work and artistic vision with my fantastic editor at Little A, got invited to panels with my literary heroes, and have read GoodReads reviews of my book that are lovelier than I could have ever imagined. And this month, I’ve already…

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Here’s what working in publicity taught me about successful self-promotion

Thursday, January 31, 2019

In my career, I’ve worked as a publicist, which means I’m accustomed to reaching out to people with cold pitches, telling them that I have something I think they’d find interesting. Sometimes, they do find whatever I’m pitching interesting and feature it on their website or talk show. Other times, I’m not so lucky. But when I put on my author hat, it suddenly feels weird to be reaching out…

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Interview & Giveaway with Stephanie Elliot, Author of SAD PERFECT

This week, we’re speaking with Stephanie Elliot, the author of young adult novel SAD PERFECT (Farrar, Straus and Giroux). SAD PERFECT tells the story of sixteen year old Pea, who struggles with a little known eating disorder known as Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). The novel was in part inspired by Elliot’s daughter’s real-life experience with the disorder. Called “a well-written page-turner whose sensitive topic is covered with finesse and grace”…

Saturday, December 8, 2018
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Do your edits like a grown-up would

Thursday, October 25, 2018

This week, we’re supposed to be writing about how to survive an edit letter — which refers to the list of revisions that your editor wants you to make after acquiring your book. I guess it’s hard to make big changes to your manuscript after you’ve sold it, but you should never really be that attached to your story anyway. You should always be open to making it better. I’ve…

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